Thursday, March 21, 2013

Use Supplements Instead of Beauty Products

This is going to be the first guest post featured on my blog! How cool is that? Healthline.com emailed me to ask if they could write an article as a guest post. This is written by Valerie Johnston.

Valerie Johnston is a health and fitness writer located in East Texas. With ambitions of one day running a marathon, writing for Healthline.com ensures she keeps up-to-date on all of the latest health and fitness news.

Many people know that supplements are good for filling in the gaps in the diet. After all, it can be tough to ingest the essential quantities of certain minerals, vitamins, and nutrients through food alone. This leaves many with the question of whether or not they should use cosmetic products to enhance the look of their skin or hair, or if supplementation is the best path?

In four words: Go for the supplements.

The reasoning is quite simple; just like the best way to get vitamins for purely nutritional purposes is to eat the food sources, and then the supplements - the best way to get beauty benefits is to use an internal source first and then an external one. In other words - you can get beauty benefits from many cosmetic products, but you will enjoy some more immediate results if you actually fill your cells with natural beautifying compounds.

Also, don't forget that some dubious cosmetic makers take advantage of the lack of FDA monitoring on some materials.

For example, some poor quality cosmetic makers use tricky wording to make products seem more effective than others. You can buy a high quality beauty cream, for example, that explains itself accurately or you can buy a product that sounds like a miracle cure and can do so because it doesn't have to "walk the talk".

Just consider that these types of products may claim to be:

● Alcohol free - but just might be free only of the compound known ethanol.

● All natural - this is not the same as organic and can be misleading.

● Clinically proven - some companies design their own tests and this can be unfair.

● Dermatologist recommended - this can be a product that has a single endorsement from a single provider!



This means that someone who wanted to make their skin glow or to truly strengthen their hair or nails may have to become a very detailed label reader. Instead, they could just use a combination of high quality products with clear labeling and the best supplements for the results desired.

The Supplement Path

This means that the smartest choices would be to use compounds that would improve and enhance looks from the inside out. And the following list of supplements includes those that will do many of the things that the cosmetic products promise, but with guaranteed effects and results.

They include:

● GLA - Gamma linoleic acid is a healthy fat that is going to work wonders for the skin, hair, and nails. It is tough to get naturally in the diet, though it does have higher concentrations in black currant and primrose oils. You can safely consume 500mg of GLA twice per day, and in around six weeks you can begin to see radiant skin and extremely healthy hair and nails.

● Fish oil - with its Omega-3 fatty acids, it is a wonderful supplement for strong nails and cellular repair. You can consume it in food sources such as walnuts, flax seeds, and salmon, but a 3 gram capsule each day is an ideal way to improve the nails and hair.

● Vitamin E - this is the classic antioxidant that will help to make repairs by combatting any free radicals and restoring cellular membranes. A daily dose of 200 I.U. can often do the trick.

● L-Lysine - the same protein that hair, skin, and nails are actually made from, this supplement will rebuild any damaged cells and form new collagen to give skin a plumper and younger look.

Now that you know that basic labeling can be misleading and that supplementation is the most efficient way to improve the looks of your hair, nails, and skin, you can make the best choices possible.

If you would like to read more on this subject you can visit http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/reading-cosmetic-labels.